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Murder Me, Monster – Cannes 2018 Review

Argentinian writer-director Alejandro Fadel doesn’t pull any punches in his ghoulish and gory horror, Murder Me, Monster. His opening scene, a close-up of a woman with a slit throat slowly bleeding out and...
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BlacKkKlansman – Cannes 2018 Review

In 2012, when Obama was president and racism in America seemed to be fading, Django Unchained featured a notorious scene with the Ku Klux Klan. Squabbling about eyeholes and spare bags, the white supremacist...
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Happy as Lazzaro – Cannes 2018 Review

Alice Rohrwacher’s gentle domestic comedy, Happy as Lazzaro, is a hard film to define. It’s full of grim social realism, light conversational comedy, and surreal jumps in time that warp reality to make...
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The Beguiled – Review

Colin Farrell fucks his way to freedom in this intoxicating remake of Don Siegel and Clint Eastwood’s 1971 Southern Gothic. Sofia Coppola’s version is faithful to the original, but adopts a more restrained...
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24 Frames – Cannes 2017 Review

The late Abbas Kiarostami was a true visionary, responsible for some of the most powerful and thought-provoking cinema of the last four decades. He continues to pursue new ways of expressing himself in 24...
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Out – Cannes 2017 Review

Gyorgy Kristóf’s Out proves that unemployment and fear of foreign workers aren’t limited to the more affluent nations of Europe in this sweet story about a factory worker struggling to get by. Ágoston...
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Radiance – Cannes 2017 Review

If there’s one thing a film festival always proves, it’s that there are countless ways to see the world: fast, slow; violent, peaceful; restrained, exaggerated; joyous and heartbreaking. Naomi Kawase’s...
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Graduation (Bacalaureat) – Review

Joint winner of Best Director at Cannes 2016, Cristian Mungiu returns with his finest work since his sublime Palme d'Or winner 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days with Graduation, an intelligent, elegant, morally...
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Personal Shopper – Review

Best described as "divisive" at its Cannes premiere, Olivier Assayas and Kristen Stewart's brave and uncategorisable second collaboration Personal Shopper swings fearlessly for the fences and only narrowly...
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Elle – Review

Raucous, outrageous and more than a little bit preposterous, Paul Verhoeven's provocative “rape comedy” Elle will ruffle feathers for its apparently callous use of rape as a narrative device – but,...
Loving

Loving – Review

Its fascinating subject and a pair of wonderfully nuanced performances - from the glowing and defiant Ruth Negga in particular - can't keep Loving from feeling somewhat safe and unadventurous, helmed though it...