Hope Gap

Hope Gap – Review

This film was previously reviewed in October 2019 as part of our London Film Festival coverage. With Marriage Story prominent on the festival circuit, LFF's other divorce drama, Hope Gap, threatens to be...
Min

Minamata – Berlinale 2020 Review

With today’s headlines, there could be a strong film made from the historical investigation, aided by an American ex-war journalist, into the widespread mercury poisoning wrought by the Chisso Corporation in...
Emma3

Emma. – Review

This is the most visually striking Austen adaptation since Clueless. But unfortunately efforts have gone into the Grand Budapest-hued aesthetic above all else, leaving Emma with absolutely nothing new to...
Sometimes Always Never Movie (1)

Sometimes Always Never – Review

This review was originally published as part of our London Film Festival coverage on 13/10/2019. Loss and longing has ripped through three generations of the Mellor family. The setup is bleak, the visual...
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The Bookshop – Review

This film was previously reviewed on 19/02/2018 as part of Berlinale 2018. Charming and inconsequential, The Bookshop perfectly evokes the sensation of losing yourself in a good book. Nothing too heavy –...
The Bookshop

The Bookshop – Berlinale 2018 Review

Charming and inconsequential, The Bookshop perfectly evokes the sensation of losing yourself in a good book. Nothing too heavy – more of a summer read than daunting prose – we are led stepping into its...
Bill Nighy

The Limehouse Golem – Review

The Victorian era has provided fertile ground for cinema’s lust for murder, mystery, and debauchery, particularly around the unsolved Jack the Ripper murders. What The Limehouse Golem offers is a precursor...
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Their Finest – Review

Second World War-based films seem to be a particularly British obsession – but here comes Their Finest to remind us, in a rather shining example, why that's quite a good idea. A sweet, spiky and...
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Dad’s Army – Review

At last - Britain has produced a true geri-action film. Albeit more geri and less action, Dad’s Army takes on Jerry with a troupe of the ablest British national treasures available. The new - and...

I, Frankenstein – Review

I, Frankenstein is one-part Mary Shelley to three thousand parts "makers of the Underworld quadrilogy". Apart from Frankenstein's Monster – here named Adam and unbelievably ripped for a quasi-zombie –...