Las Mil Y Una

One in a Thousand – Review

Fascination with a cooler, older girl is a rite of passage for teenage girls of a more bashful disposition. In One in a Thousand, the younger girl, Iris (Sofia Cabrera), has been expelled from school. She is...
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Atlantis – Review

Writer, director, and cinematographer Valentyn Vasyanovych’s film opens with a wordless execution and shallow burial captured on infrared cameras. Suddenly it is 2025 – one year after “the war” in an...
Red Moon Tide

Red Moon Tide – Review

While we await the reopening of cinemas across the UK, MUBI are currently releasing some of the most interesting new films for home viewing. New to the platform is Red Moon Tide, Lois Patiño’s...
Une Colonie

A Colony – Review

This film was previously reviewed in February 2019 as part of our Berlinale coverage. School can be a hostile environment – particularly for those who don’t quite fit in. A Colony centres around Mylia...
Uppercase Print

Uppercase Print – Review

This film was previously reviewed in February 2020 as part of our Berlinale Film Festival coverage. Hybrid documentaries often use their newly-filmed footage to advance narrative drama in the absence of its...
THE DAY AFTER I'M GONE

The Day After I’m Gone – Review

It can take a fright for someone to realise their behaviour has to change. For Yoram, that fright is his 17-year-old daughter Roni attempting suicide. After the death of Roni’s mother over a year ago, the...
Take Me Somewhere Nice

Take Me Somewhere Nice – Review

The youth road trip movie is a storied genre, and Take Me Somewhere Nice carves out its spot by contrasting a modern setting with a retro production design. The film follows Alma (Sara Luna Zoric), a Bosnian...
THE GRAND BIZARRE

The Grand Bizarre – Review

To fabric what the 2015 documentary Atomic was to nuclear history, Jodie Mack’s The Grand Bizarre makes the tiniest thread feel significant. Great patterns pulse on screen – shot on 16mm with a Bolex –...
Jonny Greenwood_Junun

Junun – Review

First off: this is not a documentary about, or ode to, Jonny Greenwood – he’s barely in it. Instead, Anderson constructs a largely wordless impressionistic illustration through music, played live...