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London Symphony – Review

This virtuoso display of editing weaves together a staggering volume of footage of contemporary London, addressing a wide spread of themes and geography with knife-sharp monochrome cinematography. Though...
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God’s Own Country – Review

Like Hope Dickson Leach’s The Levelling, God’s Own Country offers visceral insight into the life of an isolated farming family. Both films contain frank visuals of the necessary brutalities of farming and...
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Cars 3 – Review

Although it’s hardly the most eagerly anticipated Pixar film of recent years, Cars 3 is great fun. While elements of the plot are nonsensical or just not adequately thought through, both the screenplay and...
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The Last Word – Review

The Last Word is a rare and unusual treat which ignores the obsessive boundaries of Hollywood genre filmmaking, and is all the richer for it. It takes a while to find its groove, however; the opening,...
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Romans – EIFF 2017 Review

Romans tells a mostly gripping and urgent story, but the film’s underwhelming and sometimes misjudged decisions keep it from rising above superior fare that tackles similar issues, namely Spotlight and...
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Okja – EIFF 2017 Review

Pigs make for effective publicity stunts. While filmmakers, artists and activists have purposely exploited the porcine for its political worth, some politicians have found themselves at the centre of a media...
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Satan Said Dance – EIFF 2017 Review

Like Xavier Dolan’s Mommy, Satan Said Dance is shot in 1:1 aspect ratio, amplifying the sense that the main character finds her life entrapping. Though Katarzyna Roslaniec’s film has flashy style and...
Sami Blood

Sami Blood – EIFF 2017 Review

Appearing on screen above its English translation, the Swedish title of Amanda Kernell’s debut feature Sameblod might provoke some interesting thoughts in the minds of its English-speaking audiences. A film...
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Paris Can Wait – EIFF 2017 Review

Paris Can Wait, the first foray into fiction from Eleanor Coppola (wife of Francis Ford), is at best a Woody Allen-esque Americans-do-Europe travelogue, and at worst a boring and indulgent piece of wealth...

The Green Inferno – Review

Making his directorial debut with Cabin Fever in 2002, with a further array of torture porn quickly on the way through Hostels one and two, actor/producer/director Eli Roth freely continues his gore-laden...