Spring – LFF Review

Death leads to dubious love in this endlessly inventive delight that pays no regard to traditional genre boundaries. Directors Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead send bereaved lead Evan (Lou Taylor Pucci) on...

Honeymoon – Review

Declining to note that honeymooning at an isolated cabin in the woods - “we’re gonna have the whole place to ourselves” - is asking for trouble, Honeymoon soon passes its table-setting cliché and...

The Babadook – Review

Even for the occasional horror fan, The Babadook feels far too full of the usual clichés: a troubled child, a distressed (bereaved) mother and - what’s that? A haunted house? Writer and director Jennifer...

Oculus – Review

Don't be fooled by its lo-fi roots – a single-setting chamber horror with a haunted rococo mirror as the villain of the piece – Mike Flanagan's Oculus does more to a familiar premise than most...

The Last Days on Mars – Review

It might be a brave new world but we’ve definitely been here before. The humdrum minimalism of Sunshine and Alien crossed with the runny-screamy parts of Alien and Sunshine mean little is unexpected, even...

The Quiet Ones – Review

The Quiet Ones has its moments: some tense, atmospheric, quiet ones, and some VERY LOUD ONES! Pogue utilises the (clichéd) old house setting effectively, and the cattle-prod scares give equally predictable...

I, Frankenstein – Review

I, Frankenstein is one-part Mary Shelley to three thousand parts "makers of the Underworld quadrilogy". Apart from Frankenstein's Monster – here named Adam and unbelievably ripped for a quasi-zombie –...