Sofia

Sofia – Cannes 2018 Review

It’s rare to leave the cinema wishing a 90-minute film was longer, but Meryem Benm'Barek’s Sofia shows enough promise to demand a more substantial story. She wastes no time getting into the action, going...
Asako

Asako I & II – Cannes 2018 Review

Ryûsuke Hamaguchi’s Asako I & II is an endearing Japanese rom-com with a high-concept premise. Asako (Erika Karata) falls in love with Baku (Masashiro Higashide) at university, but he walks out of her...
At War

At War – Cannes 2018 Review

The spirit of ’68 is alive and kicking in At War, the latest politically charged drama from the formidable pairing of director Stéphane Brizé and actor Vincent Lindon. We’re thrown straight into the...
Jeune Femme

Jeune Femme – Review

This film was previously reviewed on 23/05/17 as part of Cannes Film Festival. Roaring down the trail blazed by the likes of Lena Dunham’s Girls, Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s Fleabag and Gillian...
1mu

Murder Me, Monster – Cannes 2018 Review

Argentinian writer-director Alejandro Fadel doesn’t pull any punches in his ghoulish and gory horror, Murder Me, Monster. His opening scene, a close-up of a woman with a slit throat slowly bleeding out and...
Shoplifters

Shoplifters – Cannes 2018 Review

Hirokazu Kore-eda is on familiar ground with Shoplifters, the story of an unconventional family unit on the fringes of society who beg, steal and borrow to get by. It’s the most fun Kore-eda has been in...
1b

BlacKkKlansman – Cannes 2018 Review

In 2012, when Obama was president and racism in America seemed to be fading, Django Unchained featured a notorious scene with the Ku Klux Klan. Squabbling about eyeholes and spare bags, the white supremacist...
1hl

Happy as Lazzaro – Cannes 2018 Review

Alice Rohrwacher’s gentle domestic comedy, Happy as Lazzaro, is a hard film to define. It’s full of grim social realism, light conversational comedy, and surreal jumps in time that warp reality to make...
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Fahrenheit 451 – Cannes 2018 Review

Ray Bradbury’s iconoclastic 1953 novel has not been this relevant for a long time. Fahrenheit 451 was written as a defence of books and intellectualism against the growth of TV and other mindless...