In Bruges stars Colin Farrell and Brendan Gleeson reunite in The Banshees of Inisherin, written and directed by Martin McDonagh, a black comedy set on the fictional island of Inisherin, just off Ireland’s coast, that tells the tale of two lifelong friends who reach an impasse in their relationship after Pádraic (Farrell) discovers that Colm (Gleeson) no longer wants anything to do with him.

This film was shot mostly in Inishmore, which provides us a stunning backdrop that is highlighted by Ben Davis’ cinematography and Simon Willis’ use of sound, and with the abundance and importance of animals as a representation of innocence, it’s a setting that should elicit a sense of peace. But all of this is starkly contrasted with the conflicts created solely by the humans, both on the island and in the Civil War that’s seemingly far away but always present, and these contradictions work together to fully immerse us in the chaos, while also serving as a metaphor that extends beyond the trivialities on the island.

McDonagh’s screenplay makes this place and its people feel real despite the absurd circumstances. Even the patrons at the bar who may only have a few speaking lines seem as though they’ve existed there forever and will continue to live on long after the credits roll. This clever screenplay is brought to life by Farrell and Gleeson, who are, as expected, a joy to watch on screen together, but not enough praise can be sung for Kerry Condon and Barry Keoghan, whose hilarious performances elevate this film to another level.

The Banshees of Inisherin is brilliant. It’s a film that at once feels so small yet so universal, with McDonagh allowing the audience a glimpse into these people’s souls. Through this exaggerated, dark humour, we’re shown the true nature of the world and the humans who inhabit it.

RATING: 5/5


INFORMATION

CAST: Colin Farrell, Brendan Gleeson, Kerry Condon, Barry Keoghan

DIRECTOR: Martin McDonagh

WRITER: Martin McDonagh

SYNOPSIS: Two lifelong friends who reach an impasse, resulting in alarming consequences for both.