One of Cannes Film Festival’s most anticipated films, Wes Anderson’s The French Dispatch, is a love letter to journalists that consists of a collection of short stories in the final issue of a magazine published in a fictional twentieth-century French city. This film is packed full of Anderson’s usual all-star cast, with the likes of Bill Murray, Adrien Brody, Tilda Swinton, and newly welcoming Timothée Chalamet in a bathtub.

As most have already noted, The French Dispatch is the most Wes Anderson that Wes Anderson has ever been. And what more is there to say about his filmmaking that hasn’t already been said ad nauseam? Exceeding expectations, this film is wholly entertaining, inventive, and so filled to the brim with quirky characters and story lines that you cannot let your mind wander for even a second, for fear of missing out on one of the many clever jokes and visual gags.

Anderson’s attention to detail is as mind-blowing as ever, with each scene appearing like a painting thanks to impressive staging, costumes, and set design. There is always something on screen to admire and everything comes together like clockwork. There’s even a fully animated scene during a point of intense action which is delightfully surprising and added the final touch this film needed.

Benicio del Toro, Timothée Chalamet, and Jeffrey Wright, who star as three of the main characters of each short story give stand-out performances, but with a cast like this, it comes as no surprise that everyone is at the top of their game.

Unfortunately, one complaint is that it is almost too busy, making it difficult to connect to any of the story lines on a deeper level. Despite this, there is still a very welcome emotional punch that comes at the end of The French Dispatch, sure to make every Anderson fan well-up.

RATING: 4/5


INFORMATION

CAST: Benicio del Toro, Timothée Chalamet, Tilda Swinton, Saoirse Ronan, Léa Seydoux, Frances McDormand, Adrien Brody, Bill Murray

DIRECTOR: Wes Anderson

WRITERS: Wes Anderson, Jason Schwartzman, Roman Coppola, Hugo Guinness

SYNOPSIS: A love letter to journalists that brings to life a collection of stories published in “The French Dispatch Magazine.”